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1895.] 401 [Brintou. 

Some Words from the Andagueda Dialect of the Choco Stock. 

By Daniel G. Brinton, M.D. 

{Head before the American Philosophical Society, Nov. 15, i8pj.) 

The Andaguedas are a tribe called by themselves Emberak, 
which means simply " men " or " people," who wander about the 
upper tributaries of the Atrato river, Colombia, South America, 
principally on its right bank. They are called the Andaguedas, 
from the river of that name, and it is from a small branch of the 
tribe that the subjoined vocabulary has been taken. It was ob- 
tained for me in June last by Mr. Henry Gregory Granger, at the 
Capio Gold Mines, on the river mentioned. He carefully verified 
the words by subsequently uttering them to Indians other than 
those from whom he learned them, and in every case thus proved 
their correctness. 

He describes the Andaguedas as quite short in stature, the males 
averaging about five feet and the females about four feet in height. 
This is noteworthy, as other observers have spoken of them as taller 
than their neighbors, the Cunas. 

They are migratory, go nearly naked, have few arts, but make 
pottery. Their favorite weapon is the blow-gun, called by them 
bor-ro-kay-ra. With this they hurl small poisoned darts, bee-ro-tay. 
They are wrapped at the but with a fine fibrous floss to make them 
fit into the tube of the gun. 

The poison is stated to be extremely virulent, fatal in a few min- 
utes to any mammal, and without known antidote. It is alleged to 
be obtained from a small tree toad, by piercing him alive through 
the back, and then slowly roasting him over a fire, when the poison 
exudes on his surface. Into this, without further preparation, the 
sharp ends of the arrows are rubbed, and, when dry, they are ready 
for use. 

Although the Andaguedas have been placed in the Choco lin- 
guistic stock by various writers, and by myself in my work on the 
linguistic classification of the American race,* this has been on the 
reports of local residents, no specimen of their dialect having been 
printed. The brief list which I now publish has, therefore, a value 

* The American Race: A Linguistic Classification and Ethnographic Description of the Na- 
tive Tribes of North and South America, p. 176 (New York, 1891). 



Brinton.] 



402 



[Nov. 15, 



of its own ; and the greater, as recent researches tend to place the 
Choco stock in a much more prominent position in South American 
linguistics than had been heretofore surmised. Its apparent affini- 
ties with several of the languages of northwestern Brazil, and the 
close proximity of the tribes speaking it to the isthmus of Panama 
and the northern continent, promise that a thorough analysis of its 
words and forms will throw new light on the prehistoric migrations 
between North and South America. 

Comparative Vocabulary of the Andagueda Dialect of the 

Choco Stock. 



Man, 


mo-Au-nah. 


Tado, 


umujina. 


Woman, 


mtoay-rali. 


Chami, 


uera. 


Sun, 


em-way-tow. 


Chami, 


uitiata. 


Moon, 


hey-day' -co. 


Samho, 


jedeco. 


Fire, 


tu-be-chu'-ah. 


Chami, 


tibuzhia. 


Water, 


pun-e'-ah. 


Tado, 


panea. 


Head, 


bbr-ro. 


Chami, 


bqro. 


Eye, 


tow. 


Chami, 


tao. 


Ear, 


coo -rue. 


Chami, 


guru. 


Mouth, 


ee. 


Sambo, 


ii. 


Nose, 


coon. 


Sambo, 


cung. 


Tongue, 


he-rem'-mee. 


Sambo, 


quirame. 


Tooth, 


hu'-dah. 


Chami, 


guida. 


Hand, 


hoo-ah. 


Sambo, 


jua. 


Foot, 


hun-u-Jia. 


Tado, 


jinuga. 


House, 


tay. 


Tado, 


tee. 


One, 


ab-bah'. 


All dialects, 


aba. 


Two, 


oh-may. 


it 


ome. 


Three, 


om-pay-ah. 


<< 


ompea. 


Four, 


hu-mah'-ru. 


it 


quimari. 


Five, 


hoo-wah-swm-mah. 


It 


guasoma. 


Ten, 


du-eh-sah. 






Twenty, 


wan-tzab-bah. 







In Mr. Granger's vocabulary the letters and syllables are assigned 
their usual sounds as in English, the ow as in " now," the oo as in 
" tool," etc. In the words introduced for comparison, the Spanish 
sounds must be assigned to the letters. 

It is obvious that the dialect is a pure Choco, especially close to 
the Chami and Sambo forms of the tongue.